Three Rivers Ranch’s Newsfeed

Thank you for visiting our newsfeed.  You’ll find the latest news on the Henry’s Fork of the Snake River, fishing news from around Idaho, and other news from Three Rivers Ranch.

 

Snowpack melting rapidly: below-average water supply likely by mid-summer

On March 12, snow-water-equivalent (SWE) in the Upper Henry's Fork subwatershed was 122% of the 30-year median. Unfortunately, the last two weeks brought record high temperatures, and we have already lost a large amount of snow. Today, SWE in the Upper Henry's Fork is only 104% of median. SWE is 127% of median in the Fall River subwatershed (down from its peak of 137%) and 125% of median in the Teton River subwatersed (down from its peak of 138%). Although some of the early snowmelt has been stored in Henry's Lake, Grassy Lake, and Island Park Reservoir--and in local and regional aquifers--the vast majority of recent record-high streamflows has flowed out of the upper Snake River basin. This water will not be available later in the summer when we need it most. Check back next week for detailed predictions of streamflow for the upcoming spring and summer. Current conditions Graph above shows percent-of-median SWE since November 1 in the three subwatersheds of the Henry's Fork watershed. Also shown is the percent-of-median SWE for the Henry's Fork and Teton Basins, as reported in the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) daily snow/precipitation report. Table below shows data for individual sites, as well

Timing of snowmelt: why is it important and what do we know about it?

Timing of snowmelt runoff affects river ecology, trout behavior, fishing experience, and mid-summer streamflow in natural and regulated river reaches. Runoff timing is most strongly influenced by April-June temperatures (warmer = earlier runoff) and April 1 snow-water-equivalent (SWE; more snow = later runoff). Since 1930, runoff timing in the upper Henry’s Fork has displayed a parabolic (upside-down “U”) trend over time, with the latest runoff occurring in the 1970s. Date of 30-day peak streamflow in the upper Henry’s Fork in 2015 and 2016 ranked 2nd and 9th earliest, respectively, in the last 87 years. Earliest runoff on record occurred in 1934. Over the past 30 years, mean April-June temperature at the watershed’s snow survey sites has warmed at 1.29°F per decade. All other factors being equal, this moves the 30-day peak flow window 5.4 days earlier each decade. Global climate models and data predict continued warming over the next few decades, so we can expect continued earlier runoff. Runoff timing is poorly predicted by conditions in the month of March, so it is too early to make precise predictions of runoff timing in 2017. However, rapid loss of low- and mid-elevation snow since March 10 is greatly reducing the amount

Spring-time streamflows predicted to be higher than last year

Based on snowpack and baseflow conditions as of March 1, predicted natural streamflows for the upcoming April 1 - June 30 time period are: Henry's Lake: 121% of average Henry's Lake to Island Park Dam: 91% of average Henry's Fork upstream of Ashton: 88% of average Fall River: 115% of average Teton River at St. Anthony: 139% of average Full results are shown in the table below. The text explains methods and inteprets the output. "Natural streamflow" What is it? Like all streams in the Snake River basin, the Henry's Fork and its tributaries are highly managed for irrigation and hydroelectric power generation. Water is stored in and released from reservoirs, diverted from streams, pumped from aquifers, recharged into aquifers, and returned to streams after passing through irrigation systems and power plants. Thus, streamflow on any given day in most of our rivers differs from what it would be in absence of reservoirs, diversions, power plants, etc. However, the water supply that flows into the managed river/reservoir system is still the product of natural hydrologic processes that start with precipitation on the watershed and include snow accumulation and melt, runoff, natural aquifer recharge, and aquifer outflow. This water is what

Upper Henry’s Fork snowpack reaches 120% of median

On February 7, snow-water-equivalent (SWE) in the Upper Henry's Fork subwatershed was 99% of the 30-year median. The intervening month has brought heavy precipitation to the entire watershed, raising the Upper Henry's Fork SWE to 120% of median. SWE is 131% of median in the Fall River subwatershed (up from 121% on February 7) and 135% of median in the Teton River subwatersed (up from 133% on February 7). All three subwatersheds have already reached their median peak SWE for the whole season. Graph above shows percent-of-median SWE since November 1 in the three subwatersheds of the Henry's Fork watershed. Also shown is the percent-of-median SWE for the Henry's Fork and Teton Basins, as reported in the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) daily snow/precipitation report. Table below shows data for individual sites, as well as the subwatersheds and the NRCS Henry's Fork and Teton Basins index. If you would like to receive daily updates of this graph and table via email, send a message to Rob at rob@henrysfork.org with "SWE request" in the subject line. To see how we use raw data from the NRCS SnoTel website to calculate the numbers in the graph and table above, download our SWE

August 21 – Experience the Full Solar Eclipse at Three Rivers Ranch

On August 21st, 2017 we will have a rare total solar eclipse pass through the Upper Snake River Valley!  As you can see from the pictures, we'll be directly in the path.  Late August typically brings no clouds and great weather, and great fishing as well so plan accordingly.  We still have some spots available and are honoring our 2017 rates. To reserve a spot, call Three Rivers Ranch today at (208) 652-3750 or send us an email.

Upper Henry’s Fork snowpack reaches 99% of median

Ten days ago, snow-water-equivalent (SWE) in the Upper Henry's Fork subwatershed was 89% of the 30-year median. As forecast 10 days ago, storms over the past few days have favored the northern part of the watershed for a change, raising the Upper Henry's Fork SWE to 99% of median. SWE is 121% of median in the Fall River subwatershed (up from 113% nine days ago) and 130% of median in the Teton River subwatersed (up from 123% nine days ago). Forecast calls for four more days of wet weather, followed by a week-long dry period. Graph above shows percent-of-median SWE since November 1 in the three subwatersheds of the Henry's Fork watershed. Also shown is the percent-of-median SWE for the Henry's Fork and Teton Basins, as reported in the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) daily snow/precipitation report. Table below shows data for individual sites, as well as the subwatersheds and the NRCS Henry's Fork and Teton Basins index. If you would like to receive daily updates of this graph and table via email, send a message to Rob at rob@henrysfork.org with "SWE request" in the subject line. To see how we use raw data from the NRCS SnoTel website to

Idaho & Eastern Oregon 2017 Water Report

**Photos Updated on Feb 21, 2017 Snow, snow, and more snow. So far the winter of 2016/2017 has been nothing short of good news for our mountain snowpack’s throughout much of Idaho and the West. As we approach spring, we can be highly optimistic that this snowpack, in turn will provide a solid spring runoff and good water for all the rivers this coming summer. All of our Snake River Drainages are well above average for snowpack and water content so fingers crossed, it’s looking good! Do keep in mind that we still have another 2 months of snowfall accumulation to go, and in that time period a lot can change. But as of now, things are looking good. Lets break it down on some of the local snowpack drainages that feed the Boise River, Owyhee River, and our Eastern Idaho Rivers. The Owyhee River Drainage As of February 6th, The Owyhee River drainage is at 154% of normal snowpack for this time of the year. Of the many tail water rivers we enjoy, this river system needs as much snowpack as they can get to ensure us a great summer of fishing, and ample flows that will stay cool

South Fork Snake River Fly Fishing Report, Winter Fishing in Eastern Idaho for February 1, 2017

South Fork of the Snake River Fly Fishing Report: The South Fork of the Snake River has been fishing quite well.  Those of you looking for a great day, head up to the Swan Valley area.  There will be some dry fly action on sunny days and when temperatures start to get around 32 degrees and above.  When packing your fly box, make sure and take midges, rubber legs, small zebras, & dark streamers in black & dark olive.  You can also use a San Juan worm or an egg pattern, but only when you’re super desperate or approaching an “oh-fer” or close to getting skunked. Reserve your Snake River Guided Fly Fishing Trip Today.

Henry’s Fork Fly Fishing Report – Winter Fishing Report for February 1, 2017

Henrys Fork Fly Fishing Report:   The Henry’s Fork is pretty tough to fish as of lately.  The ice shelf is pretty extensive covering about 15 feet into the river.  On the lower section of the Henrys Fork, the ice shelf covers roughly 1/3 of the river.  Be EXTREMELY CAREFUL as the ice is slushy and slick!  It’s not entirely a lost cause, so don’t fret.  The best place to get a little fishing in is up near Warm River around Stone’s Bridge (the boat ramp in Warm River off Fishermans Drive).  We’re looking forward to the slightly warmer temperatures February may bring.  So look for sunny days and temperatures rising above 32 degrees. Stop by our Ashton Fly Shop & Liquor Store to stock up on flies. Flies to use:  Rubber Legs, Prince nymphs, pheasant tail, zebra midges, & streamers (black, dark olive)